George Soros Rises To The Top Of The Political Landscape Once Again In 2016

The U.S. political landscape is now filled with many of the biggest political financial donors in the world who have often been accused of having far too much political influence in the 21st century. Although he may no longer be the largest political donor on the left of the U.S. political spectrum, George Soros remains as influential as ever before for Democrat’s looking to win elections at national, state, and local levels, according to Politico. Soros has returned to the political landscape of the U.S. in 2016 after missing much of the previous two Presidential election campaigns due to his unhappiness with the forwarding of the liberal agenda of President Barrack Obama; Soros is well known for his leftist views that include the legalization of illegal drugs and the opening of borders to mass immigration in the fashion of the European Union. Read his profile at Business Insider.

During the buildup to the 2016 Presidential election campaign George Soros became one of the most outspoken critics of now President Donald Trump and accused him of using right wing rhetoric to drive up hatred against minority groups across the U.S. and wider world. In his role as one of the patriarchs of the Democratic Party, George Soros played a key role in the nomination of Hillary Clinton as the first female candidate for President from one of the two main U.S. political parties; Soros and Clinton have shared a political friendship that has expanded over 25 years to allow the two to share an open door policy in the buildup to the 2016 election to allow Soros access to key policy points developed by the Clinton campaign. In developing the key points of political policy with Clinton, George Soros once again entered U.S. politics at a high level and sought to create a better future for global citizens through the advancement of a series of left wing policies. Visit projectsyndicate.com to know more about George.

Among the aspects of the return of George Soros that have been so shocking for those who know the Hungarian born founder of Soros Fund Management is that he withdrew from political donating after feeling the U.S. funding laws were “odious”. After 2004, George Soros had suggested he would no longer provide major political funding for political parties or candidates; however, Soros has spent around $25 million in the 2016 election campaign season as he sought to create a higher level of support for Hillary Clinton. Soros set out to back a number of Super PAC’s and support groups for minority groups supporting Clinton, including a number of those concerned with encouraging minority group voters to take part in the voting process during the 2016 election season as the drive for more votes for the Clinton campaign grew as the election drew closer.

Read more: http://www.cnbc.com/george-soros/

Progressives Fight Big Money with End Citizens United

Advancing Support for Campaign Finance Reform

With growing political unrest in America stemming from extreme economic disparity, there are many grassroots efforts proving that human decency still packs a punch in the face of dark forces. End Citizens United comes as a response to the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizen’s United decision, which opened the gates for special interests to sway elections with unlimited and untraceable amounts of money. A political action committee charging forward to reform the rules of campaign financing, the group’s overarching goal is to introduce and pass a constitutional amendment that would reverse the 2010 decision. The hope is that overturning the decision would be the first step in a road toward a more transparent political system that establishes accountability for donors and beneficiaries, setting the stage for a more representative government.

What Do They Stand For?

The whole movement means to get to the root of it, working to elect officials that would vote in favor of the progressive cause and stand up to dark-money groups. Additionally, they hope to help put in place campaign finance reform on the state and local scale, a much more attainable portion of the bigger vision. To make a new constitutional amendment a reality, it would need the nod from two-thirds of the House and Senate, and ratification by 75% of the states. The last amendment passed was done so in 1992, with America finding itself comparably in an irrefutably more divided state.

Show Me the Money:

Preaching financial transparency, the group’s makes their financial information available on their website (endcitizensunited.org), showing that they have been raising ambitious levels of money as feelings of angst furiously swell under the custody of a new POTUS. This comes as a stark comparison to the stance of the new President, who has famously refused to release his financial records. However, even with healthy influx of funding, they will still have a hard time making the amendment a reality anytime soon. In the meantime, however, they do serve an important purpose in laying the groundwork of awareness on the small scale, which is necessary to gain majority support in the future and keeps a level of accountability in current political actors.

The Problem:

Many from the Democratic party are leading the battle of overturning Citizens United, as The End Citizens United PAC is met with opposition by Congressional Republicans, who are known to benefit from unlimited donations and other rigged elements of the system. With a flurry of excitement and support developing around the cause and others like it, the stage has been set to foster progressive values, working toward a more tolerant and equitable USA.

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A Torontoans Take on Donald Trump’s Messy Run

It’s no secret that Donald J. Trump’s presidential campaign has been rather contentious. Indeed, even now, when the Republican presidential nomination seems ripe for his picking, there are people that say his campaign either, “Is just not serious,” or, “has no chance.” But the number of people who have regularly said this (especially in the mainstream media) is shrinking rapidly. This is, in many ways, due to the steady shift in general public opinion about Trump himself and how he’s branded himself. Take for instance the fact that when Mr. Trump first entered the race, for some time then, only a scant 9 % of registered republican voters thought that that they he was “Very Likely” to win the GOP nomination. However, that changed very quickly, jumping up to 25 % of all GOP voters who thought he was very likely to win, in addition, 17 % of all voters thought that he could win. But this was just in the very early months of his campaign.

Presently, a potent 93 % of GOP voters say they strongly believe that Mr. Trump is very likely to win the nomination with a additional 82 % of all voters across political lines believe similarly. Only five percent of all registered GOP voters believe that is not very likely for Mr. Trump to get elected, with a similar 14 % of bipartisan voters taking up this same position. He;s

All of this being said, this appears to be Mr. Trump’s path to victory, simply: defending his public perception. Due to the fact that the overwhelming majority of the public thinks he can win exponentially increases the possibility that he will win. Though nothing is set in stone, as many have previously said, “America likes winners.”